Posts Tagged ‘History’

My Letter to Wendell Berry

My Letter to Wendell Berry

February 4, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Two and a half years ago I wrote to Wendell Berry. I had just turned 30 and, reflecting back upon my life, I felt the need to write him a letter of thanks for the guiding force his words had been to me. At the time, I had known of his work for ten years and had his book "The Art of the Commonplace" for nearly as long. Below is an excerpt of my letter to him, and below that is the great compliment I received from him only weeks later....

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The Future of Sudan

The Future of Sudan

November 20, 2010  |  Blog, History, Politics, Travel  |  No Comments

The story of Sudan is a complicated story, so it’s no wonder many are unsure what exactly is happening in Africa’s largest country. It has been an embittered battle fought on many fronts composed of many different tribes, languages, and religions, and lasting for decades. Since 1955, two civil wars have been fought between the north and south. The second ended after 22 years of bloodshed with a peace agreement in 2005, granting Southern Sudan autonomy for six years. On January 9th of 2011, a new chapter will be pressed with ink-stained fingers....

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The Feminism Needed by Men

The Feminism Needed by Men

May 31, 2010  |  Blog, Featured, History, Politics  |  1 Comment

Since childhood, it seems I have always been drawn to history. One of the first books I remember reading dealt with the American Revolution. And my grandparents had one of those satellite dishes big enough to communicate with E.T. so I would often watch documentaries on the History Channel with my grandfather. There was something in the characters of history that led me to believe that there was still something to be learned from their actions — otherwise why would we bother writing down their experiences? I recently watched the HBO miniseries, John Adams, which caused me to think more about that time period, and what issues are still addressed today. His relationship with his wife, Abigail became most of my focal point in thought. And with that came feminism....

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At the Lunch-Counter

At the Lunch-Counter

May 21, 2010  |  Blog, History, Politics  |  1 Comment

In this past week, Rand Paul, the Tea Part candidate, and son of wealthy Texan congressman Ron Paul, has been in the news for winning the Republican primary for the Kentucky Senate seat. He has since gained more press for stating that he favors 9 out of 10 titles of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The one he questioned is Title II of the Act, which prohibits private business from discriminating on the basis of race, religion, or national origin. Basically, he believes that the Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina (which became a landmark event during the U.S. civil-rights movement in 1960) should have never been told by the Federal government to serve Black customers. Doing so would infringe upon Woolworth’s Constitutionally-enshrined freedoms. He does say however that he will not support any efforts to repeal the Civil Rights Act, and that he is not in favor of any discrimination of any form....

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